No matter how you define rich, this is the only way to get there.

Copy Source: http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/the-only-way-to-get-really-really-rich.html

The Only Way to Get Really, Really Rich

 

No matter how you define rich, this is the only way to get there.
14.7k SHARES

Want to be remarkably successful? Want to get really rich? (While there are many ways to feel “rich,” in this case we’re talking about monetary wealth.) Then check out this little gem of an investment opportunity.

It’s a simple investment. You only have to invest almost all of your money. On the upside, after a year you might earn 3 percent more. The downside? Any day you could lose it all, for reasons usually outside your control and that you will almost never see coming.

Would you make that investment? Of course not.

Yet millions of people do–every day they go to work for someone else.

Of course the analogy isn’t perfect. Until you’re laid off or fired you do earn a salary. But when you work for someone else, your upside is always capped–sure, you might occasionally get a raise, but in most cases 3 to 4 percent is the best you can expect.

Yet your downside is always unlimited because getting fired or laid off can make your income disappear overnight–and with it the considerable investments you’ve made in time, effort, dedication, and sacrifice.

Extremely limited upside. Unlimited downside.

That’s a terrible investment.

Rich in Wealth

So if you hope to get really rich, working for someone else will never get you there. But don’t just take my word for it, the government agrees.

The IRS Statistics of Income Division, a place where fun surely goes to die, has published “400 Individual Tax Returns Reporting the Largest Adjusted Gross Incomes Each Year, 1992-2009,” or in non government-speak, “400 People Who Earned a Freaking Boatload of Money.”

In 2009, it took $77.4 million in adjusted gross income to crack the top 400. (That just barely got you in; the average income of everyone on the list was $202.4 million.)

Where it gets interesting is how the top 400 made their money:

  • Wages and salaries: 8.6 percent
  • Interest: 6.6 percent
  • Dividends: 13 percent
  • Partnerships and corporations: 19.9 percent
  • Capital gains: 45.8 percent

A few conclusions are obvious:

  • Working for a salary won’t make you really rich.
  • Making only safe “income” investments won’t make you really rich.
  • Investing only in stock of large companies won’t make you really rich.
  • Owning a business or businesses could not only build a solid foundation of wealth but could someday…
  • Generate a huge financial windfall–and make you really rich.

Don’t trust the IRS? Fine. Check out the top 10 on the Forbes billionaires list. Gates. Buffett. Ellison. Koch. Walton. Adelson. All entrepreneurs. (I worked my way down into the 200s and still couldn’t find an employee, so I got bored and stopped looking.)

Clearly getting really rich in financial terms is the result of investing in yourself and others, of taking risks, of doing hundreds of small things right…and then doing one or two big things really right.

But what if you don’t get one or two big things really right? There’s another way to get really rich.

Rich in Life

I’ve spoken to hundreds of entrepreneurs, and each and every one does the same thing. When we talk about the financial side of being an entrepreneur–exit strategies, revenues, IPOs, cashing out–they’re interested but far from animated.

But when we talk about the life of an entrepreneur, about how it feels to be an entrepreneur, they all light up. They start to gush about the challenges, the responsibility, the sense of mission, the sense of purpose, the sense of fulfillment and excitement of working with and for a real team, the amazing feelings of empowerment and the control over their own destinies….

It happens every time.

The bootstrappers with infinite dreams and negligible revenues light up.

The successful entrepreneurs such as Joel Gascoigne, who helped expand Buffer from a personal project into a business with a talented team with real revenues, light up.

The hugely successful entrepreneurs such as Scott Dorsey, who helped steer ExactTarget out of a garage, into an IPO, and then into an acquisition by SalesForce.com, light up.

Every entrepreneur lights up when we talk about being an entrepreneur because they feel alive: free to chart their own courses, to make their own decisions, to make their own mistakes–to let the sky be the limit not just financially but also (and almost always more importantly) personally, too.

And in that way, regardless of financial return, they feel really rich. And they are really rich — regardless of income or wealth.

Really, Really Rich

That’s why the only way to become really rich financially and really rich personally–in other words really, really rich–is to start your own business. Even if it’s just on the side. Even if it’s just a slightly stepped-up hobby.

There’s no reason not to. You don’t have to quit your job right away; in fact, you probably shouldn’t. (One of the best ways to minimize your risk is to keep your full-time job while you build your foundation for success.) Plus the basics of starting a business are easy; you can do it in one day.

Here’s the deal. In return for less freedom, less control, and less fulfillment, every day you go to work for someone else your upside is always capped and your downside is always unlimited.

The downside for entrepreneurs is also unlimited–but in return, they enjoy the possibility of an unlimited financial upside and an unlimited personal upside.

Take a chance on yourself. Try to get really, really rich. Maybe you’ll only become really rich.

One out of two is still awesome–and you will have achieved it on your terms.

If your friends and family think you were crazy for starting a business, show them this article. If you’ve been thinking about starting a business and people say you’re being foolish, show them this article.

If the people around you don’t understand how personally fulfilling taking a chance on yourself can be, have them check this out.

And then get started on your entrepreneurial journey, even in the smallest and safest way. Every step you take will bring you closer to becoming at the very least really rich–and maybe, just maybe, really, really rich–and will let you join a group of people who live their lives their way, on their own terms.

Who are those people?

Entrepreneurs. Be one.

It’s the best investment you can make–because it means you’re investing in yourself.

Read more: http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/the-only-way-to-get-really-really-rich.html#ixzz30oZPpFil

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The Nicaraguan textile and apparel industry

The Nicaraguan textile and apparel industry is in a buoyant mood after a recovery in US demand last year helped lift the sector’s exports by 14% to $1bn. Here government promotion agency ProNicaragua spells out some of the country’s competitive advantages.
Image

Nicaragua has positioned itself as one of the most dynamic platforms in the western hemisphere for manufacturing and textiles operations, with exports that reach the largest markets in the world.

Indeed, the country’s textile and apparel industry is an important development engine for the national economy. In 2010, it employed nearly 52,000 qualified workers and exported over US$1bn in apparel products, an increase of 14% versus 2009.

In terms of volume, textile and apparel exports reached 362.4m square metre equivalents (SME), increasing by 17.9% when compared to 2009.

Moreover, Nicaragua has become an important player in the global textile and apparel industry. During the past 10 years, the sector has experienced a 10.5% growth in the value of exports and a 14.3% growth in volume exported. By 2010, Nicaragua was the 12th largest worldwide apparel supplier to the US in volume.

For investors, Nicaragua has a number of competitive advantages, including:

High productivity and competitive labour costs 
Nicaragua offers one of the region’s most competitive cost structures, giving companies an edge in the global market – especially those looking to establish labour-intensive operations, such as textiles and apparel activities. The country’s labour force of 2.3m is one of the most competitive and productive in the region.

Speed to market leading to speed to profit
Nicaragua’s strategic location in the heart of Central America allows companies to deliver products to the US in as little as 50 days from the start of the program to shipment out of the Free Zone area. Due to Nicaragua’s proximity to the US, ships reach southern US ports within three to five days. Additionally, it takes 2.5 hours of flying time to Miami and Houston and there are eight daily direct flights to main US airports.

Nicaragua’s safety and business climate
According to a study carried out by CID Gallup Latin America, Nicaragua had the lowest incidence of crime in 2010 in Central America. The study measures the crime rate and population threatened by criminal acts, taking into account factors such as the risk of leaving home and drug-trafficking in school systems. The 2011 Doing Business, published by the World Bank, ranks Nicaragua as the top location in Central America in starting a business, investor protection, and closing a business.

The implementation of DR-CAFTA and its benefits
The Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA) has helped eliminate duties for most of Central America’s exports to the US and integrates the region’s economies into a single trading block. DR-CAFTA’s general rule of origin for apparel articles is ‘yarn-forward,’ meaning duty-free benefits apply when cut and sew operations take place in Nicaragua using regional yarn and fabric. Nicaragua also enjoys preferential market access to countries such as Mexico, Taiwan, Canada, Chile and the European Union.

Attractive fiscal incentives
The main legislation that governs foreign investment consists of the Foreign InvestmentPromotion Law (Law 344) and its bylaws, establishing a series of solid legal guarantees for foreign investors. Additionally, Nicaragua offers significant tax benefits under the Free Zone Regime for companies seeking to establish export-oriented operations. These include 100% exemption on income tax, Value Added Tax (VAT) and capital gains and property tax for a period of ten years.

Some of Nicaragua’s main investment opportunities in the textiles and apparel sector include:

  • Vertically-integrated production of natural and synthetic knit fabrics.
  • Yarn manufacturing for woven apparel.
  • Manufacturing of T-Shirts and all kinds of knitwear, made with natural and syntheticfabrics.
  • Manufacturing of men’s wool coats.
  • Jeans and twill garments.
  • Trims, screen printing and embroidery services.
  • Production of boxers, brassieres, pyjamas, woven shirts, shorts and baby wear, among other types of garments.

The presence of leading international companies successfully operating in Nicaragua supports the country’s credentials for establishing textile and apparel operations. Various world renowned brands source garments here, including Polo Ralph LaurenLiz Claiborne, North Face, Wrangler, Lee Jeans, Levi’s, Dockers, Dickies, Hanes and Under Armour. Apparel companies operating in Nicaragua also service major retail chains such as Target, JCPenneyWal-MartKohl’s and Gap

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Made in Nicaragua

Made in Nicaragua
A Briefing on the Nicaraguan Garment Industry

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Nicaragua is one of many countries producing clothes for the global garment industry. Across the world the
garment industry is experiencing increasing competition and ever greater demands from buyers for cheaper,
more flexible and faster production. The industry also exists in a context shaped by recent and ongoing
changes to international trade regulations. Though these are being negotiated by governments at the highest
level, it is the workers on the front line who are feeling the effects. This briefing covers how recent global trade
rules are affecting Nicaragua and their impacts on the mainly women workers producing the clothes.
What does the Nicaraguan garment
industry look like?
Most garment production in Nicaragua takes place
in export processing zones (EPZ), in foreign owned
factories known as ‘Maquilas’. EPZs are specially
designated areas, exempt from many of the
national tax laws in order to attract foreign
investment and new jobs to the country. The
largest EPZ in Nicaragua is Las Mercedes, based
just outside the capital of Managua1. The factories
are owned mainly by Taiwanese, Korean and US
companies and employ around 30 000 people,
producing clothes for sale mostly in North
America1,2. Though the Maquilas offer employment
opportunities for some, they are also known for
their bad working conditions, repression of trade
unions and insecure employment. While these
conditions persist, the chances for improving living
standards, even for those with jobs, are severely
limited.
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How has the end of the Multi-Fibre
Arrangement affected Nicaragua?
On 1 January 2005, the Multi-Fibre Arrangement
(MFA) came to an end. The agreement had
regulated trade in the textile and garment industry
for over thirty years, by limiting the amount of
exports from any one country into Canada, the US
and the EU. Since the ending of the MFA pressure
has increased on countries to provide a cheap and
flexible workforce, although the full extent of the
impact is still not known.
So far, the Nicaraguan garment industry has done
extremely well in this new environment. It has
shown the second highest growth rate in value of
garment exports since 20053, and though it can’t
compete with China on costs, its proximity to the
US market has allowed it to continue attracting
investment. In fact it is the only country in Central
America where investment has increased, with one
Taiwanese company investing US$94 million in
2006 to expand its facilities4.
While it is good that companies are not stopping
production in Nicaragua, this success needs to be
accompanied by a commitment to good working
conditions. Average wages for Nicaraguan
garments workers are only ¼ of what it is needed
to buy basic goods, factory conditions are poor and
verbal and physical abuse of workers is common5.
If workers are to really benefit from increased
investment significant improvements in these
conditions are needed.
What is DR-CAFTA and how will it affect
garment workers?
DR-CAFTA is the Dominican Republic – Central
American – United States Free Trade Agreement.
It was signed by the Nicaraguan Government in
2005 and implemented in 2006. The agreement
means Nicaraguan garments and textiles can be
exported duty free to the US, providing potential
new advantages to Central American producers.
However, DR-CAFTA has been criticised on
several fronts. Alone, the benefits it brings for
Central American producers are not enough to
outweigh the advantages countries like China have
in wage costs and infrastructure. It’s therefore
unlikely to lead to a significant increase in
investment in garment production. It is, however,
likely to have a significant impact on the
agricultural sector, which may lead to increasing
rural unemployment in Nicaragua as agricultural
imports from the US increase and domestic
producers go out of business. For garment workers
You’re sitting down all day on a wooden bench
with no back. The lighting isn’t very good and
by the end of the day you can’t see anything,
not even the hole in the needle. But still, they
don’t want you to lose even one minute.”
Auxiliadora Abarca, ex-worker, Las Mercedes
Free Trade Zone.1
“Of primary concern to Nicaragua lawmakers is
the 60% unemployment rate. Because of this,
free trade zone operators enjoy laws that provide
them with maximum freedom and benefits.”
Nicaraguan private free trade zone website.1
this could mean more competition for jobs and
more downward pressure on wages as
unemployed agricultural workers move into the
cities in search of work.
Finally, DR-CAFTA has been heavily criticised for
its failure to include adequate protection for labour
rights. Under the agreement each country is only
responsible for enforcing its own labour laws, no
matter how weak they may be, and there is no
effective penalty system for countries failing to do
this1. Nicaragua’s labour laws are currently only
weakly enforced and employers have frequently
been found to be flouting them. Examples include
non-payment of wages, companies deducting
social security payments but failing to declare
these to the government (making workers ineligible
for welfare) and discrimination on grounds of age
and gender. Many women are forced to take
pregnancy tests before they are given work and
there is significant repression of trade unions,
despite workers having a legal right to join one. In
addition, employer ‘black lists’, containing the
names of people who are members of unions,
have been found circulated amongst factory
owners and used to prevent the employment of
people with previous union involvement.
What is the EU – Central America
Association Agreement and how could it
affect garment workers?
In 2007 the EU began negotiations with Central
American governments to form an ‘Association
Agreement’ between the two regions, including the
formation of a free trade area. The EU hopes the
agreement will promote sustainable development,
human rights and democracy, however there are
concerns over this given the large economic and
political inequalities between Central America and
the EU. As negotiations begin, a coalition of NGOs
and trade unions will be asking the EU to ensure
that the promotion of decent working conditions is
high on the agenda, that negotiations are open and
transparent and that civil society organisations are
consulted.
As the number of free trade areas expands, it is
essential that governments remain able to override
free trade principles if they are in conflict with other
social and welfare priorities.
What is already happening to protect
workers rights? What else is needed?
Nicaraguan garment workers have not taken the
erosion of labour rights in EPZs lying down and
have been active in engaging with the government
and factories to improve conditions. In 1998 the
‘Maria Elena Cuadra Movement of Working and
Unemployed Women’ designed a ten article code
of conduct for garment factories, covering working
hours, wages, maternity leave and job security.
The code was accepted by the Ministry of Labour
in Nicaragua and soon after by all the factory
owners in Las Mercedes. It has led to some
improvements in working conditions, though
workers point out that there is still a long way to go.
The Maria Elena Cuadra Movement is also
continuing to raise awareness amongst garment
workers of their rights and gathering information on
companies that are discriminating against trade
union members.
As freer trade and greater competition continue to
be the guiding principles shaping the Nicaraguan
garment industry, it is essential that the people
producing the clothes are not forgotten. Protecting
and improving the working conditions for those at
the end of the chain needs to be kept high on the
agenda, both in international government
negotiations and for the major clothing retailers
and brands.
“You always have to consider the people who
are producing the clothing and take into
account that the workers are exploited –
robbed of their youth, their health, their
education and their children, whom they don’t
have time to see.” Nicaraguan garment
worker6
Labour Behind the Label
http://www.labourbehindthelabel.org tel. 01603 66616 email info@labourbehindthelabel.org
Central American Women’s Network (CAWN)
http://www.cawn.org tel. 0207 8334174 email info@cawn.org
(Websites accessed Feb 2007) 1. http://www.maquilasolidarity.org/resources/maquilas/nicaragua.html,
2. http://www.globalexchange.org/countries/americas/nicaragua/3353.html 3. A-Genda, March 2006, CAWN, 4. http://www.juststyle.com, ‘Nicaragua: Taiwan’s
Nien Hsing to invest US$94m in fabric plants’, 16 May 2006. 5. http://www.icftu.org, Spotlight interview with Marcelina Garcia, 4 March 2006.
6.www.studentsagainstsweatshops.org, ‘Update on Mil Colores-Chaprich Factory in Nicaragua’
To find out more about how you can support garment workers in Nicaragua and elsewhere, contact
Labour Behind the Label or CAWN on the details below.

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8 Things Remarkably Successful People Do

8 Things Remarkably Successful People Do

The most successful people in business work differently. See what they do–and why it works.

runner winning race

I’m fortunate to know a number of remarkably successful people. I’ve described howthese people share a set of specific perspectives and beliefs.

They also share a number of habits:

1. They don’t create back-up plans.

Back-up plans can help you sleep easier at night. Back-up plans can also create an easy out when times get tough.

You’ll work a lot harder and a lot longer if your primary plan simply has to work because there is no other option. Total commitment–without a safety net–will spur you to work harder than you ever imagined possible.

If somehow the worst does happen (and the “worst” is never as bad as you think) trust that you will find a way to rebound. As long as you keep working hard and keep learning from your mistakes, you always will.

2. They do the work…

You can be good with a little effort. You can be really good with a little more effort.

But you can’t be great–at anything–unless you put in an incredible amount of focused effort.

Scratch the surface of any person with rare skills and you’ll find a person who has put thousands of hours of effort into developing those skills.

There are no shortcuts. There are no overnight successes. Everyone has heard about the 10,000 hours principle but no one follows it… except remarkably successful people.

So start doing the work now. Time is wasting.

3.  …and they work a lot more.

Forget the Sheryl Sandberg “I leave every day at 5:30” stories. I’m sure she does. But she’s not you.

Every extremely successful entrepreneur I know (personally) works more hours than the average person–a lot more. They have long lists of things they want to get done. So they have to put in lots of time.

Better yet, they want to put in lots of time.

If you don’t embrace a workload others would consider crazy then your goal doesn’t mean that much to you–or it’s not particularly difficult to achieve. Either way you won’t be remarkably successful.

4. They avoid the crowds.

Conventional wisdom yields conventional results. Joining the crowd–no matter how trendy the crowd or “hot” the opportunity–is a recipe for mediocrity.

Remarkably successful people habitually do what other people won’t do. They go where others won’t go because there’s a lot less competition and a much greater chance for success.

5. They start at the end…

Average success is often based on setting average goals.

Decide what you really want: to be the best, the fastest, the cheapest, the biggest, whatever. Aim for the ultimate. Decide where you want to end up. That is your goal.

Then you can work backwards and lay out every step along the way.

Never start small where goals are concerned. You’ll make better decisions–and find it much easier to work a lot harder–when your ultimate goal is ultimate success.

6. … and they don’t stop there.

Achieving a goal–no matter how huge–isn’t the finish line for highly successful people. Achieving one huge goal just creates a launching pad for achieving another huge goal.

Maybe you want to create a $100 million business; once you do you can leverage your contacts and influence to create a charitable foundation for a cause you believe in. Then your business and humanitarian success can create a platform for speaking, writing, and thought leadership. Then…

The process of becoming remarkably successful in one field will give you the skills and network to be remarkably successful in many other fields.

Remarkably successful people don’t try to win just one race. They expect and plan to win a number of subsequent races.

7. They sell.

I once asked a number of business owners and CEOs to name the one skill they felt contributed the most to their success. Each said the ability to sell.

Keep in mind selling isn’t manipulating, pressuring, or cajoling. Selling is explaining the logic and benefits of a decision or position. Selling is convincing other people to work with you. Selling is overcoming objections and roadblocks.

Selling is the foundation of business and personal success: knowing how to negotiate, to deal with “no,” to maintain confidence and self-esteem in the face of rejection, to communicate effectively with a wide range of people, to build long-term relationships…

When you truly believe in your idea, or your company, or yourself then you don’t need to have a huge ego or a huge personality. You don’t need to “sell.”

You just need to communicate.

8. They are never too proud.

To admit they made a mistake. To say they are sorry. To have big dreams. To admit they owe their success to others. To poke fun at themselves. To ask for help.

To fail.

And to try again.

 

Source: http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/8-habits-of-remarkably-successful-people.html?nav=pop 

Jeff Haden learned much of what he knows about business and technology as he worked his way up in the manufacturing industry. Everything else he picks up fromghostwriting books for some of the smartest leaders he knows in business. @jeff_haden

 

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Taking Initiative: The Options Are Endless

Taking Initiative: The Options Are Endless

A recent poll of executives asked, ” What do you feel is the single best way for employees to earn a promotion and/or raise?” Topping the list for 82% of the respondents was ” Ask for more work and responsibility.”

Employees who take initiative greatly enhance their chances for recognition, learning, advancement, pay raises, and bonuses – and have a more meaningful and exciting time at work. Here are some ways in which an employee can take greater initiative in his or her job:

  • Thinking outside the box. To think outside the box, look for new combinations, ask ” what if” or develop ” what if” scenarios, consider approaches you’ ve never considered before, brainstorm with others, and be a champion of new ideas.
  • Doing your homework. Preparation is often the key to success in any endeavor. You will be more successful in convincing others that what you believe is the right thing if you are armed and ready with the facts.
  • Taking action – capitalizing on opportunities. Progressive companies realize that they need employees at all levels who are willing and encouraged to take chances and to make decisions – and be willing to take responsibility for their actions.
  • Making improvements. One of the easiest and most effective ways to take initiative is to be on the lookout for ways to improve the work processes, products, services, and systems that are a vital part of how the organization does its business.
  • Persevering. Employees who excel at taking initiative usually must also persist in the ideas and actions in which they believe. To persist – even over the objections of your manager or others – takes even more commitment and courage.

Source: http://www.inc.com/articles/1999/09/16417.html

Copyright 1999 Bob Nelson, Nelson Motivation Inc.

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Danish Government Scholarship

Danish Government Scholarship

Open to: students or researchers enrolled at a university in selected countries

Denmark offers scholarships for both long-term study periods and summer languages courses to foreign students.
Please note, the scholarships are only offered to students or researchers enrolled at a university in their home country.

The Agency for International Education in Denmark offers government scholarships to applicants from higher education institutions from the countries mentioned below:
–  19 EU-countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Spain, and the Netherlands
–  Iceland, Switzerland, Serbia and Turkey
– Non-european countries: ChinaJapanIsraelEgypt and Russia.

Long-term scholarships

* EU-countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Spain, and the Netherlands
* Iceland, Serbia, Switzerland and Turkey

application form and all required copies of documentation (in PDF-format) should also be printed, copied, signed and sent by ordinary mail, postmarked no later than the 28th of February 2011
* the following documents must be enclosed in your application
– Curriculum vitae signed and dated by you
– Translated and certified copies of your diplomas
– Certificate of proficiency in English
– Detailed program for your study/research period in Denmark

* all documents should be sent to:
“Application form – Cultural Agreements 2011-12″
The Danish Agency for International Education
Fiolstræde 44
1171 København K
Denmark

Summer Language Scholarships

List of Danish summer courses in 2011 in Denmark

Eligibility

The summer language courses in Danish are open to Bachelor’s, Master’s and Ph.D. students.

The summer language course scholarships are available for students from the following countries and institutions:

* Group 1: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Egypt, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovak Republic, Spain, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and Turkey

* Group 2: Israel, Russia and the following institution in China (exclusively):

* Beijing Foreign Studies University, The Danish Department, The Institute of European Language and Culture, Beijing, P.R. China

* Group 3: Selected institutions in Canada, Lithuania, Switzerland, USA:

* University of British Columbia, Department of Central, Eastern and Northern European Studies, Vancouver, Canada
* Portland State University, Dept. of Foreign lang. and Literature, Portland, OR, USA
* University of California, Department of Scandinavian Studies, Berkley, CA, USA
* University of Texas at Austin, Department of Germanic Studies, Austin, TX, USA
* University of Washington, Scandinavian Department, Seattle, WA, USA
* University of Wisconsin, Department. of Scandinavian Studies, Madison, WI, USA
* University of California, The Scandinavian Section, Los Angeles, CA, USA

If you are an applicant from a country in Group 1 and 3, please use the application form here.

If you are an applicant from a country in Group 2, please use the application form here.

The deadline for applying for the Danish Summer Language Scholarships is March 28th, 2011

For more information about the Danish Summer Language Courses, please contact Nelly-Ann Hansen at kulturaftaler@iu.dk

Read more: http://www.mladiinfo.com/2011/03/09/danish-government-scholarships/#ixzz25NpoSHOt

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Danish Government Scholarship

Danish Government Scholarship

Open to: students or researchers enrolled at a university in selected countries

Denmark offers scholarships for both long-term study periods and summer languages courses to foreign students.
Please note, the scholarships are only offered to students or researchers enrolled at a university in their home country.

The Agency for International Education in Denmark offers government scholarships to applicants from higher education institutions from the countries mentioned below:
–  19 EU-countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Spain, and the Netherlands
–  Iceland, Switzerland, Serbia and Turkey
– Non-european countries: ChinaJapanIsraelEgypt and Russia.

Long-term scholarships

* EU-countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Spain, and the Netherlands
* Iceland, Serbia, Switzerland and Turkey

application form and all required copies of documentation (in PDF-format) should also be printed, copied, signed and sent by ordinary mail, postmarked no later than the 28th of February 2011
* the following documents must be enclosed in your application
– Curriculum vitae signed and dated by you
– Translated and certified copies of your diplomas
– Certificate of proficiency in English
– Detailed program for your study/research period in Denmark

* all documents should be sent to:
“Application form – Cultural Agreements 2011-12″
The Danish Agency for International Education
Fiolstræde 44
1171 København K
Denmark

Summer Language Scholarships

List of Danish summer courses in 2011 in Denmark

Eligibility

The summer language courses in Danish are open to Bachelor’s, Master’s and Ph.D. students.

The summer language course scholarships are available for students from the following countries and institutions:

* Group 1: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Egypt, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovak Republic, Spain, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and Turkey

* Group 2: Israel, Russia and the following institution in China (exclusively):

* Beijing Foreign Studies University, The Danish Department, The Institute of European Language and Culture, Beijing, P.R. China

* Group 3: Selected institutions in Canada, Lithuania, Switzerland, USA:

* University of British Columbia, Department of Central, Eastern and Northern European Studies, Vancouver, Canada
* Portland State University, Dept. of Foreign lang. and Literature, Portland, OR, USA
* University of California, Department of Scandinavian Studies, Berkley, CA, USA
* University of Texas at Austin, Department of Germanic Studies, Austin, TX, USA
* University of Washington, Scandinavian Department, Seattle, WA, USA
* University of Wisconsin, Department. of Scandinavian Studies, Madison, WI, USA
* University of California, The Scandinavian Section, Los Angeles, CA, USA

If you are an applicant from a country in Group 1 and 3, please use the application form here.

If you are an applicant from a country in Group 2, please use the application form here.

The deadline for applying for the Danish Summer Language Scholarships is March 28th, 2011

For more information about the Danish Summer Language Courses, please contact Nelly-Ann Hansen at kulturaftaler@iu.dk

Read more: http://www.mladiinfo.com/2011/03/09/danish-government-scholarships/#ixzz25NpoSHOt

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New Zealand Government Scholarships for International Students

New Zealand’s educational institutions are well regarded throughout the world. There is a great range of opportunities available to international students here: quality secondary school education, a well established network of English language schools, and internationally respected and recognised tertiary education providers.

Read more: New Zealand Government Scholarships for International Students 2011 : 2012 2013 College Scholarships, PhD Scholarships, Postdoctoral, Graduate International Scholarships Fellowships 
http://scholarship-positions.com 

 

New Zealand Government Scholarships:

The New Zealand Aid Programme supports sustainable development in developing countries in order to reduce poverty and contribute to a more secure, equitable and prosperous world.

The New Zealand Government offers the following scholarships to candidates of selected developing countries:

View the list of eligible countries and participating New Zealand education institutions.

New Zealand Development Scholarships (NZDS) provide the opportunity for individuals from targeted developing countries to undertake studies at tertiary education institutions in New Zealand. The purpose of the scholarships is for candidates to gain knowledge and skills in specific subject areas that will assist in the development of their home country by contributing to identified human resource development (HRD) training needs. Awardees are required to return to their home country for at least two years after the completion of their scholarship to apply these new skills and knowledge in government, civil society or private business organisations.

The New Zealand Development Scholarships scheme is funded by the New Zealand Government’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) programme. The New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT), delivers the scheme through the New Zealand Aid Programme.

Read the full list of eligible countries

Check your eligibility for the Commonwealth Scholarships Scheme

Download the New Zealand Development Scholarships application form

General eligibility criteria

Applicants must meet the following New Zealand Development Scholarship eligibility criteria before their application will be considered against the selection criteria, including any region-specific criteria.

To be eligible to be considered for a New Zealand Development Scholarship, applicants must:

  • be a citizen of a New Zealand Development Scholarship participating country ( permanent residents are not eligible to apply)
  • be residing in their country of citizenship, preferably for at least two years prior to application
  • not have citizenship or permanent residence status of New Zealand or Australia or another developed country*
  • not be married or engaged to be married to a person who holds, or who is eligible to hold, citizenship or permanent residence of New Zealand, Australia or another developed country
  • be aged 17 or over before the scholarship start date
  • be applying to commence a new qualification and not be seeking funding for one already commenced in New Zealand or another country
  • not have completed, or nearly completed, a qualification at a similar level (i.e. applicants must apply for a higher level qualification than any previously attained), unless strong developmental relevance is demonstrated
  • satisfy the admission requirements of the New Zealand education institution at which the qualification is to be undertaken, including English language criteria
  • have been working in their home country, preferably for at least two years prior to application, including since completing their highest tertiary qualification gained to date
  • be able to demonstrate a strong commitment to the public or private or community sector (as relevant) of their home country, and to their country’s development in general
  • be able to take up the scholarship in the academic year for which it is offered.

Further Scholarship Information and Application

Scholarship Tags: 

Read more: New Zealand Government Scholarships for International Students 2011 : 2012 2013 College Scholarships, PhD Scholarships, Postdoctoral, Graduate International Scholarships Fellowships 
http://scholarship-positions.com 

Posted By: GatewayAusralia.wordpress.com>>Another creative Blog site for everyone.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

New Zealand Government Scholarships for International Students

New Zealand’s educational institutions are well regarded throughout the world. There is a great range of opportunities available to international students here: quality secondary school education, a well established network of English language schools, and internationally respected and recognised tertiary education providers.

Read more: New Zealand Government Scholarships for International Students 2011 : 2012 2013 College Scholarships, PhD Scholarships, Postdoctoral, Graduate International Scholarships Fellowships 
http://scholarship-positions.com 

 

New Zealand Government Scholarships:

The New Zealand Aid Programme supports sustainable development in developing countries in order to reduce poverty and contribute to a more secure, equitable and prosperous world.

The New Zealand Government offers the following scholarships to candidates of selected developing countries:

View the list of eligible countries and participating New Zealand education institutions.

New Zealand Development Scholarships (NZDS) provide the opportunity for individuals from targeted developing countries to undertake studies at tertiary education institutions in New Zealand. The purpose of the scholarships is for candidates to gain knowledge and skills in specific subject areas that will assist in the development of their home country by contributing to identified human resource development (HRD) training needs. Awardees are required to return to their home country for at least two years after the completion of their scholarship to apply these new skills and knowledge in government, civil society or private business organisations.

The New Zealand Development Scholarships scheme is funded by the New Zealand Government’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) programme. The New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT), delivers the scheme through the New Zealand Aid Programme.

Read the full list of eligible countries

Check your eligibility for the Commonwealth Scholarships Scheme

Download the New Zealand Development Scholarships application form

General eligibility criteria

Applicants must meet the following New Zealand Development Scholarship eligibility criteria before their application will be considered against the selection criteria, including any region-specific criteria.

To be eligible to be considered for a New Zealand Development Scholarship, applicants must:

  • be a citizen of a New Zealand Development Scholarship participating country ( permanent residents are not eligible to apply)
  • be residing in their country of citizenship, preferably for at least two years prior to application
  • not have citizenship or permanent residence status of New Zealand or Australia or another developed country*
  • not be married or engaged to be married to a person who holds, or who is eligible to hold, citizenship or permanent residence of New Zealand, Australia or another developed country
  • be aged 17 or over before the scholarship start date
  • be applying to commence a new qualification and not be seeking funding for one already commenced in New Zealand or another country
  • not have completed, or nearly completed, a qualification at a similar level (i.e. applicants must apply for a higher level qualification than any previously attained), unless strong developmental relevance is demonstrated
  • satisfy the admission requirements of the New Zealand education institution at which the qualification is to be undertaken, including English language criteria
  • have been working in their home country, preferably for at least two years prior to application, including since completing their highest tertiary qualification gained to date
  • be able to demonstrate a strong commitment to the public or private or community sector (as relevant) of their home country, and to their country’s development in general
  • be able to take up the scholarship in the academic year for which it is offered.

Further Scholarship Information and Application

Scholarship Tags: 

Read more: New Zealand Government Scholarships for International Students 2011 : 2012 2013 College Scholarships, PhD Scholarships, Postdoctoral, Graduate International Scholarships Fellowships 
http://scholarship-positions.com 

Posted By: GatewayAusralia.wordpress.com>>Another creative Blog site for everyone.

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Time to rein in unregulated offshore migration agents

Time to rein in unregulated offshore migration agents

  • BY:AINSLIE VAN ONSELEN 
  • From:The Australian 
  • July 27, 2012 12:00AM

A MAJOR frustration with the practice of immigration law in this country is that if you are a migration agent registered under the Migration Act you have to comply with processes and regulations far more stringent than migration agents based offshore.

But overseas-based agents who assist immigrants to come to Australia are entirely unregulated and do not even have to be registered. This is beyond farcical.

If you suggested to a lawyer or legal regulator that offshore lawyers could prepare and file court documents on behalf of a client in any of the Supreme Courts or Federal Court in this country without having been admitted to that court and without holding a current practising certificate, they would be stunned into silence. The idea is so preposterous there would be an outcry, and for good reason.

Just like lawyers, migration agents have to set aside time from their busy workloads to complete continuing professional development courses each year. Their offshore counterparts do no such thing.

 

Local agents have to pay hefty annual registration (renewal) fees, in excess of $1500, with the Office of Migration Agents Registration Authority, while offshore agents pay nothing.

Australian agents incur professional indemnity insurance fees, while their offshore equivalents again pay nothing. New regulations require Australian agents to pass strict English language testing requirements, while offshore agents don’t have to.

The local migration agents are effectively operating with one hand tied behind their back so long as offshore counterparts — whom they compete with for clients — are free to go about their business entirely unregulated.

Proper regulation and oversight of the legal profession is essential to the smooth operation of the rule of law — a fundamental tenet of good government and public confidence in the system.

And so it should be for migration matters as well. So why is it that offshore unregistered migration agents are permitted to assist with the preparation and filing of applications for visas and residence in this country on behalf of clients at Australian posts overseas?

In 2001-02 an estimated 2500 offshore migration agents (mostly unregulated) lodged such applications and in 2004 the Department of Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs estimated this figure to be about 3000. Unfortunately, no later figures have been released, but the consensus among the migration profession is that these figures are much higher now.

The consumer protection peril of this practice is obvious — ignorance or unfamiliarity with Australian laws can lead to the proffering of inaccurate and incorrect advice.

Key findings of a 2002 survey conducted by the Migration Agents Policy and Liaison Section on the quality of service provided at overseas posts were startling — failure to keep up to date with legislative changes; regularly asking very basic questions; limited competence; delays in responding to the department; discourtesy; overcharging; suspected fraudulent applications and alleged bribery.

Shouldn’t the working of the Migration Act and the duties and obligations imposed be seen as a microcosm of the rule of law?

Doesn’t that dictate that migration agents, be they operating offshore or onshore, should be properly regulated and overseen?

Evident by two reports published by DIMIA — now the Department of Immigration and Citizenship — in 2002 and 2004, the government has been aware of the litany of problems created by offshore unregistered migration agents for over a decade.

Yet, the department has done nothing to address or progress the issue. There is a saying that a week is a long time in politics. What does that say about a decade of political inaction by both major parties?

There is no partisan divide to hide behind on this issue.

Don’t get me wrong, I am in no way complaining about the government’s efforts to enhance the professionalisation of the migration profession. Improving the educational and ethical standards of migration agents enhances the reputation of the profession.

However, that it hasn’t also extended its regulatory reach to offshore agents is inexcusable.

In fact, it actively disadvantages registered migration agents, requiring them to adhere to a higher standard than offshore unregistered agents.

So what’s the solution? Several alternative options were set out in the DIMIA reports of a decade ago. The first is that Australian embassy posts or DIAC refuse applications filed by non-registered agents and otherwise have no dealings with them, and deal with the applicant directly. The alternative is to extend the current registration scheme offshore.

A number of models have been set out for this, the minimum standard of which would require offshore agents to meet the same educational standards as onshore agents. At present about 4 per cent of all registered migration agents operate offshore, meaning that should the government compel all offshore agents to become registered, there is a model already in practice to be referenced.

On April 4, I met Immigration Minister Chris Bowen and discussed this issue with him. He concurred that the time was right for action. The migration profession is waiting.

Ainslie van Onselen is a law partner, company director and associate professor at the University of Western Australia. She is the independent chairperson of the Migration Institute of Australia

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